8 Steps to DIY Bokashi Composting

Bokashi: The Composting Samurai

Effective microorganisms (EM) are tiny little living entities that help break down compost and organic matter. They operate in a different way than beneficial bacteria or fungi in how they affect your plants. They turn up the volume on compost and aid in creating a soil that is rich in microbes and nutrients that you can integrate right back into your grow. Let’s dig into Bokashi.

What is Bokashi?

Bokashi is a Japanese word that means “fermented organic matter”. The term refers to both the method used and the inoculant mixture (the kick starter) used to power the fermentation process. The inoculant mixture consists of lacto acid bacteria (Lactobacillus casei), photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas palustris), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). read more


So Your Friend Told You to Use CANNA…

So, you were told you should be fertilizing with CANNA nutrients.  Why? And what does that mean?  CANNA is the industry leader in quality fertilizers, which just happen to work really really well in cannabis cultivation. They are always on the cutting edge of research and development, and share their knowledge and discoveries with the curious gardener looking to better their abilities.  

Custom Cadillac Nutrients

While other companies make fertilizers that are compatible with several different mediums, CANNA takes it many steps further.  They make substrate specific fertilizers, to maximize the health and yield of every crop.  What I mean by that is, if you want to grow in Soil, Coco, Rockwool, Soil-less, Recirculating Hydro Systems (you get where I’m going) they have a specific fertilizer line.  CANNA’s specific fertilizers (in tandem with a good climate) produce some of the best looking and tasting marijuana I have ever consumed.  But don’t just take my word for it – try CANNA for yourself! read more


Biofilm of antibiotic resistant bacteria, closeup view. Rod-shap

The Quick & Dirty Wrap-Up of Beneficial Microbes

Types of Beneficial Microbes

The idea of working with microbes can be a bit intimidating or confusing for those that have never done it before. Introducing strains and colonies to your soil culture has a number of benefits that can increase your plant yield, overall health, and vigor.

Beneficial microbes often work within the rhizosphere (the area that surrounds your plant’s root system) of your soil. This is where these beneficial buddies hang out, eat, digest and positively influence what grows above the soil.

They form mutually beneficial relationships with your plants. These bacteria and fungi help to digest potential pathogens and then convert them into food or beneficial nutrients for your plants. They have a little more going on for each other than just the mutual back scratch. read more


"Fungus, Trichoderma reesi, growing on plant material."

Trichoderma a Biofungicide

Trichoderma (Trike-oh-Derm-ah)

Trichoderma is a beneficial fungus that helps to protect your plants against molds and bacteria. These tough little guys stand up against root rot and grey mold, protecting your plants from being destroyed. They create a barrier that make it impossible for harmful bacteria and pathogens to pass through.

Trichoderma surrounds your plant’s roots releasing compounds that trigger their natural defense systems.

Fungi That Flexes

These guys aren’t messing around. Not only do they strong arm potential pathogens but they also have the ability to kill those that may already be present. Additionally, Trichoderma reduces Pythium, Fusarium and Rhizoctonia. These enzymes attack harmful soil bacteria and fungi. They wrap themselves around the harmful fungi, releasing these enzymes that then dissolve the invaders cell wall. Think of how a snake’s saliva breaks down its prey after it has swallowed it whole. Yeah, kinda like that. The sexy action term for it is “microbe parasitism.” read more


Spirillum bacteria

5 Ass Kicking Applications for Azospirillum

Azospirillum, Fixing Nitrogen Like a Boss

Flatulance, while this might be an oversimplification, is essentially the process from which Azospirillum convert nitrogen gas to plant usable, ammonia (NH3). When it comes to nutrition nitrogen is the limiting factor in plant growth, playing a key role in almost every process of a plants life. In effect, azospirillum also affect almost every process of a plant’s life. So yeah, it’s pretty important!

Passing Gas

Nitrogen exists in our air and our soil. Actually, 78% of our atmosphere is made of nitrogen (N2). The way it exists in our atmosphere doesn’t do much for our plants unless it can take on a solid form. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria take in nitrogen the way that we do oxygen.
Then they excrete it as a solid form that plants can use. When nitrogen is taken from gas to solid, it is called
nitrogen fixation. read more


5 Things You Need to Know About Beneficial Bacteria

We had the awesome opportunity to sit down with Scotty Real of Real Growers and The Dude Grows Show. Scotty brought his 25 years of expertise to the table, helping us shed light into the dark corners of the soil world.

Before we jump into beneficial bacteria, we should first talk a little bit about the rhizosphere. Why? Because that is where you will find all of the bacterial action we are about to discuss. The rhizosphere is the microbial party zone.

Often called “the last frontier in agricultural science,”  the rhizosphere is the area around a plant’s roots. What makes the rhizosphere more special than other areas in the soil? Roots release special compounds called exudates with which microbes interact, basically functioning as all-you-can-eat salad bars for our microbial friends. Root exudation is a complex process and the many compounds released by roots are not fully studied or understood.  We do know, however, that some of these exudates are “amino acids, organic acids, sugars, phenolics” as well as polysaccharides. read more


Growing with CO2

Growing with CO2: Improve Your Yield Part II

When growing in an artificial environment, the goal is to mimic nature and all of its benefits. When aiming to increase your product yield with a natural option, using CO2 in your grow is sure to produce results.

How Does Growing with CO2 Work?

Biology 101

The biological use of CO2 in plants can be explained in Biology 101. Plants use CO2 in production of their own nutrients that enable them to grow during a process known as photosynthesis. Plants receive water (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) that when activated by sun or artificial light releases oxygen (O2) and carbohydrates (C6H12O6) that they use as food. The concept of increasing CO2 levels in your grow acts as a catalyst for growth using its own biological processes. read more


Sproutin' Knowledge

Mycorrhizae: Improve Your Yield Part 1

Mycorrhizae- what it is and why you need it

What is mycorrhizae?

Good fungi vs. bad fungi

Not all fungi are bad for plants. In fact, there are a variety of different fungi that are good for plants.  Some are even essential for plant health.  The relationship between these good fungi and plant roots are called mycorrhizal associations, or mycorrhizae.  The awesome effects of mycorrhizae can be seen in vibrant healthy plant growth, robust flowering, and healthy, living soil.

These two organisms (fungi and plant roots) live together in a mutually beneficial symbiosis where the fungi get either nutrients, metabolites, or a combination of both from the host.  Fungal symbiosis occurs all the time in nature, but we don’t always see it.  You can often find mushrooms living around tree bases in forests, but there is a lot more going on underground that we don’t see.  And in fact, the vast majority of symbiotic fungal relationships live their whole lives in the soil where we don’t see the important impacts of these relationships. read more


Super Soil

What is Super Soil? Plus A Professional Review

The best part about it is the consistency.  I rarely, if ever, see any nutrient deficiencies, across various plant types.”

What is Super Soil?

Super soil is a term coined by well-known grower and seed producer Subcool to describe a soil recipe he uses to help simplify the process of attaining an ideal harvest no matter your level of growing expertise. It is a highly amended growing medium that eliminates the need to use liquid nutrients.  Subcool, who operates TGA Genetics, has been a contributor to High Times, Skunk, Treating Yourself, Heads, Weed World, and West Coast Magazines.  He has won the Cannabis Cup, is an accomplished author, and has over 30 years of experience as a grower. read more


Read This Fogmaster Jr. 5330 Review If You Spray Much

Confession: I love an Inanimate Object, the Fogmaster Jr. 5330.

What is the Fogmaster Jr. 5330?

It’s a compact hand-held sprayer with a 1/4HP 120V motor.

For some time I had considered buying an industrial sprayer/fogger/atomizer but most seemed like overkill, especially when inexpensive pump-style sprayers would suffice. The Fogmaster Jr. 5330 however, appealed immediately due to its manageable size. When I asked a trusted friend about it, his eyes opened extra wide as he looked directly at me and said “they rock”. He was right.

I know of one other convert, so, for the record, there are at least three Fogmaster Jr. groupies in Colorado. read more


What is OMRI?

When it comes to agriculture, the definition of “Certified Organic” can be contentious. Farmers, lobbyists, activists, PR firms, etc. have different standards and stakes in a growing multi-billion dollar per year industry.The non-profit Organic Materials Review Institute has been helping to formally define “organic” since 1997, years before the industry took off and our government got involved.

If an input (like a fertilizer or pesticide) appears on OMRI’s Products List, then it is approved for use on certifiable organic cash crops. Sounds great if you’re in the business of making organic nutrients or pesticides… but it’s not easy to get on the list. To do so, a product must pass OMRI’s expert reviews which are technical, scientific, and political. There are multiple levels of review by representatives from all facets of the industry. Point being, if a product earns the OMRI stamp of approval, you can be confident in its organic integrity. Gardening with OMRI listed products can help ensure that what you grow is truly as “organic” as it can possibly be. Find out more at omri.org which includes a very cool and useful search function that lets you surf the OMRI Products and Materials Lists. Got a nutrient or chemical and want to know if you can use it on an organic crop? Looking for organic products? Check the OMRI lists. read more