Cloning with Xtreme Gardening Azos

What is the Best Way to Clone?

Do you have one strain that you are just in love with and want to create replicas of for eternity? Well, lucky you! Cloning may still be controversial when it comes to humans but you can clone your plants at home without getting a sideways stare down.

Why Should I Clone My Plants?

Cloning is also referred to as asexual reproduction and creates genetic copies of the “mother” plant. If you have a particular strain you have grown that is resilient against pests, produces dense flowers, has a high cannabanoid profile and delicious flavor then why would you not want to replicate it over and over again? Propagating your favorite strain is a great way to save money on buying new crops, to stabilize your growing environment and grow the true cream of the crop. read more


8 Steps to DIY Bokashi Composting

Bokashi: The Composting Samurai

Effective microorganisms (EM) are tiny little living entities that help break down compost and organic matter. They operate in a different way than beneficial bacteria or fungi in how they affect your plants. They turn up the volume on compost and aid in creating a soil that is rich in microbes and nutrients that you can integrate right back into your grow. Let’s dig into Bokashi.

What is Bokashi?

Bokashi is a Japanese word that means “fermented organic matter”. The term refers to both the method used and the inoculant mixture (the kick starter) used to power the fermentation process. The inoculant mixture consists of lacto acid bacteria (Lactobacillus casei), photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas palustris), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). read more


So Your Friend Told You to Use CANNA…

So, you were told you should be fertilizing with CANNA nutrients.  Why? And what does that mean?  CANNA is the industry leader in quality fertilizers, which just happen to work really really well in cannabis cultivation. They are always on the cutting edge of research and development, and share their knowledge and discoveries with the curious gardener looking to better their abilities.  

Custom Cadillac Nutrients

While other companies make fertilizers that are compatible with several different mediums, CANNA takes it many steps further.  They make substrate specific fertilizers, to maximize the health and yield of every crop.  What I mean by that is, if you want to grow in Soil, Coco, Rockwool, Soil-less, Recirculating Hydro Systems (you get where I’m going) they have a specific fertilizer line.  CANNA’s specific fertilizers (in tandem with a good climate) produce some of the best looking and tasting marijuana I have ever consumed.  But don’t just take my word for it – try CANNA for yourself! read more


Biofilm of antibiotic resistant bacteria, closeup view. Rod-shap

The Quick & Dirty Wrap-Up of Beneficial Microbes

Types of Beneficial Microbes

The idea of working with microbes can be a bit intimidating or confusing for those that have never done it before. Introducing strains and colonies to your soil culture has a number of benefits that can increase your plant yield, overall health, and vigor.

Beneficial microbes often work within the rhizosphere (the area that surrounds your plant’s root system) of your soil. This is where these beneficial buddies hang out, eat, digest and positively influence what grows above the soil.

They form mutually beneficial relationships with your plants. These bacteria and fungi help to digest potential pathogens and then convert them into food or beneficial nutrients for your plants. They have a little more going on for each other than just the mutual back scratch. read more


"Fungus, Trichoderma reesi, growing on plant material."

Trichoderma a Biofungicide

Trichoderma (Trike-oh-Derm-ah)

Trichoderma is a beneficial fungus that helps to protect your plants against molds and bacteria. These tough little guys stand up against root rot and grey mold, protecting your plants from being destroyed. They create a barrier that make it impossible for harmful bacteria and pathogens to pass through.

Trichoderma surrounds your plant’s roots releasing compounds that trigger their natural defense systems.

Fungi That Flexes

These guys aren’t messing around. Not only do they strong arm potential pathogens but they also have the ability to kill those that may already be present. Additionally, Trichoderma reduces Pythium, Fusarium and Rhizoctonia. These enzymes attack harmful soil bacteria and fungi. They wrap themselves around the harmful fungi, releasing these enzymes that then dissolve the invaders cell wall. Think of how a snake’s saliva breaks down its prey after it has swallowed it whole. Yeah, kinda like that. The sexy action term for it is “microbe parasitism.” read more


Spirillum bacteria

5 Ass Kicking Applications for Azospirillum

Azospirillum, Fixing Nitrogen Like a Boss

Flatulance, while this might be an oversimplification, is essentially the process from which Azospirillum convert nitrogen gas to plant usable, ammonia (NH3). When it comes to nutrition nitrogen is the limiting factor in plant growth, playing a key role in almost every process of a plants life. In effect, azospirillum also affect almost every process of a plant’s life. So yeah, it’s pretty important!

Passing Gas

Nitrogen exists in our air and our soil. Actually, 78% of our atmosphere is made of nitrogen (N2). The way it exists in our atmosphere doesn’t do much for our plants unless it can take on a solid form. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria take in nitrogen the way that we do oxygen.
Then they excrete it as a solid form that plants can use. When nitrogen is taken from gas to solid, it is called
nitrogen fixation. read more


LED vs CMH Lighting

LED vs CMH Lighting Technology

Light Emitting Diodes or Ceramic Metal Halides? You Be the Judge.

Have you found yourself digging through Google pages full of LED hula hoops and burning man posts to find out more about LED lighting technology? Want to know how they stack up to LECs? Suffering from a case of FOMO when it comes to your yields? Learn from decades of lessons learned the hard way.

Ceramics, Not Just a High School Art Class

Ceramic metal halides (CMH), also known as ceramic discharge metal halides (CDM), are also known as light emitting ceramics (LECs). Basically, those are a lot of names for the same bulb and technology. CMH fixtures pull low watts and cover large areas, making them an energy-efficient choice when comparing your lighting choices. read more


LED vs. Plasma Lighting Technology

LED vs. Plasma Lighting Technology

Plasma, LED, or Neither…

LED or Plasma? Both cost a sh%#ton, so which one is better? If you have found yourself Googling answers to this question, search no more.  Let us save you time and money. Learn from our successes and failures with these two expensive a$$ grow lights. 

What’s the Deal with Plasma? 

Lighting emitting plasma (LEP), also known as plasma lights, are a full spectrum light from infrared to ultraviolet. Plasma bulbs are a solid state bulb that have no moving parts. They are not equipped, nor do they need, a fan which makes them a single piece of silent machinery.   read more


3 Lighting Measurements to Improve Your Grow

I Like Big Bulbs & I Cannot Lie – 3 Lighting Measurements to Improve Your Grow

Too Much of a Good Thing


When it comes to the lighting you use for your plants, how much is too much? Believe it or not, there is a science behind finding out how many lights you should have and how to place them. It isn’t about just putting your one plant under an incandescent bulb in your bedroom closet anymore. The research is constantly evolving in an attempt to mimic the sun- both its intensity and spectrum. Don’t miss what our Grow Guru from The Dude Grows Show had to say about his experience with the different lighting technology. Learn how you can best use the newest lighting technology to your benefit to get the most out of your plants.
read more


Come On Baby Light My Grow

Come On Baby Light My Grow

All the Colors of the Rainbow: Lighting Part I 

The impact that light has on the human eye is different than the effect it has on your plants. Plants take in light to use in the photosynthesis process to convert energy into sugars to consume as food. Different colors of the light spectrum have varying impacts on the quality of your plants, the rate at which they grow, and when they fruit or flower. We had the chance to pick the brain of  John G from Sunlight Supply, that was nice enough to share his knowledge and expertise. Come ride the colors of the rainbow with us and John and learn more about how light spectrums and light exposure affect your plants. read more


5 Things You Need to Know About Beneficial Bacteria

We had the awesome opportunity to sit down with Scotty Real of Real Growers and The Dude Grows Show. Scotty brought his 25 years of expertise to the table, helping us shed light into the dark corners of the soil world.

Before we jump into beneficial bacteria, we should first talk a little bit about the rhizosphere. Why? Because that is where you will find all of the bacterial action we are about to discuss. The rhizosphere is the microbial party zone.

Often called “the last frontier in agricultural science,”  the rhizosphere is the area around a plant’s roots. What makes the rhizosphere more special than other areas in the soil? Roots release special compounds called exudates with which microbes interact, basically functioning as all-you-can-eat salad bars for our microbial friends. Root exudation is a complex process and the many compounds released by roots are not fully studied or understood.  We do know, however, that some of these exudates are “amino acids, organic acids, sugars, phenolics” as well as polysaccharides. read more


Hydroponic Bells & Whistles

Hydroponic Bells & Whistles

Hydroponics 201

If you’re looking to improve your hydro system, you may be looking to add some new accessories to your setup. Your grow could benefit from new gadgets, like ditching your old aquarium pump for a soundless one with a longer life span. You may also be considering expanding your grow op and may want to think about automating some of your systems to save time and energy. But first, let’s continue with the 201 basics.

What’s in the Water?

When growing with a hydroponic system, you depend on water as the essential growing mechanism. Just like a gardener that has been fouled with bad soil, you can’t expect to grow a fruitful crop with contaminated water. Water is not only composed of H20 (Hydrogen and Oxygen). It also holds dissolved minerals and substances that can be both good or bad for your plants. Just because the water that you use for your grow is the same that you drink, does not mean that it is the best option for your plants. Well water, tap water or spring water all have the potential to contain water treatment chemicals, pathogens or minerals that may impact your grow. They may impact your pH, nutrient levels, and the ability of your plants to uptake nutrients. Don’t fret, these “grow contaminants” are pretty easy to take care of yourself. read more


hydroponics 101

Getting Started with Hydroponics

Hydroponics 101!

So, what’s all the hype about hydro gardens? They seem to be the next big thing in growing but how much do you really know? Maybe you have considered making the switch from soil to a hydroponic system but aren’t sure how. Lucky you! We’ve done the research, and have the experience so that you’re in the right place. Read up on the history, what, where, why and how of hydroponic gardening here!

What? Hydroponics!

Hydroponic 101: Hydroponic gardening is a system to grow plants in a way that does not require soil. That’s right, no dirt. It can be used to provide a growing area in regions that do not have arable (farmable) land or to build large-scale gardens in a small amount of space. Hydroponic systems are often simple to assemble and allow for total control of nutrient levels. Hydroponic gardening enables you to design an environment to grow most anything- during any season, anywhere in the world. read more


Gavita Pro E-Series: Advances in Grow Light Technology

Gavita Pro E-Series: Double Ended Lighting Technology

Of all the new lighting technologies available, double ended HPS bulbs and specifically the Gavita Pro E-Series Ballasts that drive them have garnered the most attention. Rightfully so, as these new fixtures are delivering the increased light output and efficiency the manufacturers claim. What are the key differences that set these lamps apart? More importantly, are they right for your application and is the extra performance and features worth the premium price?

Tech Overview:

These lamps are an evolutionary improvement over the traditional mogul base HPS bulb and digital or magnetic ballast. Let’s go over the three important differences of these fixtures versus a traditional electronic ballast and single ended bulb. read more


Air Pruning & Nursery Pots

With so many different types of nursery pots to choose from, you may be left wondering what is the difference or why does it matter? The answer is simple, performance. One of the biggest influences on performance is air pruning.

Air Pruning

Air pruning is the introduction of dry air into the root system. When this happens the apical cells at the root’s tip become dehydrated. The plant responds by growing a pair of secondary roots that branch off of the initial root. Each time the media dries out, the process repeats itself creating literally thousands of offshoot roots. This vigorous root system is much better at mining soil and increasing nutrient uptake. Air pruning also prevents the plants roots from literally strangling each other, a process known as spiraling. read more